Category Archives: MLB Jerseys

Clint Conatser Jersey

September 21, 1952: The Boston Braves play their final home game at Braves Field. They lose 8-2 to the Brooklyn Dodgers. They close the season with a trip to New York City, losing 3 to the Giants, and then a loss to the Dodgers, a win over them, and a tie that is not replayed.

March 18, 1953: The Major League Baseball owners approve the Braves’ move to Milwaukee. You could do that in those days, move a team within a month of Opening Day.

There are 11 former Boston Braves still alive, 63 years after the move. I have arranged them in chronological order, by time with the Braves, not necessarily by age:

* Eddie Carnett, 99, from Oklahoma. Left fielder, he played 2 games for the Braves in 1941, before going into the service, got his discharge, and played with the 1944 Chicago White Sox and 1945 Cleveland Indians. If he lives to see October 21, it will be his 100th birthday.

* Mike Sandlock, 100, from Greenwich, Connecticut. Catcher, played 2 games in 1942, returned for 30 games in 1944, later played for the Dodgers and the Pittsburgh Pirates. The oldest living former major leaguer.

* Harry MacPherson, 90, from the Boston suburbs. Pitcher, faced 4 batters on August 14, 1944, and got 3 of them out, without allowing a run — and never made another big-league appearance. He was finished at age 18, a situation that could only have happened with the manpower shortage of World War II.

* Clint Conatser, 94, from Los Angeles. Outfielder, 1948 and ’49. The last survivor of the Braves’ last Pennant team in Boston, of 1948.

* Johnny Antonelli, 85, from Rochester. Pitcher, 1948-50, then went into the Korean War. By the time he pitched for the Braves again, they’d moved. Traded to the New York Giants in 1954, won 21 games, the National League ERA title, and the World Series. Was also with the Giants when they moved in 1957, and closed his career back with the Braves in 1961.

* Del Crandall, 86, from the Los Angeles suburbs. Catcher, 1949-50, then went into the Korean War. By the time he pitched for the Braves again, they’d moved. An 8-time All-Star in Milwaukee, won 3 of the 1st 4 NL Gold Gloves for catchers, and starred on their 1957 and ’58 World Series teams. Later returned to Milwaukee as Brewers manager.

* Luis Olmo, 96, from Puerto Rico. Outfielder, appeared in the 1949 World Series for the Dodgers, then wrapped up his U.S. big-league career with the Braves in 1950 and ’51, before returning to the Caribbean.

* Dick Manville, 89, from Des Moines. Pitcher, tossed 2 innings on April 30, 1950, and had a brief return to the majors with the 1952 Chicago Cubs.

* Bob Addis, 90, from the Cleveland suburbs. Outfielder, 1950 and ’51. Briefly played in the Yankees’ minor-league system.

* Bert Thiel, 89, from Marion, Wisconsin. Pitcher, made 4 relief appearances for the Braves in 1952. Ironically, given his home State, never got called back up after they moved to Milwaukee.

* Gene Conley, 85, from the Seattle suburbs. Pitcher, made 4 appearances in 1952, the last season in Boston. Went into the service, came back to the Braves in Milwaukee, was the winning pitcher in the 1955 All-Star Game in Milwaukee, and pitched for them in the 1957 and ’58 World Series. Also pitched for the Philadelphia Phillies and Boston Red Sox.

The last active player for the Boston Braves was Eddie Mathews, who was also the only player to have played for them in Boston, Milwaukee (all 13 seasons) and Atlanta (just the 1st season, 1966). He remained active until 1968. The last active player for the Milwaukee Braves was Phil Niekro, who lasted until 1987.

*

UPDATE: Mike Sandlock died on April 9, 2016, making Eddie Carnett the oldest living former MLB player. Carnett did live to see his 100th birthday, but not much more. He died on November 4, 2016.

Bob Addis died on November 15, 2016. Harry MacPherson died on February 19, 2017. Luis Olmo, who had also been a living former Brooklyn Dodger, died on April 28, 2017. Gene Conley died on July 4, 2017. Dick Manville died on February 13, 2019. Clint Conatser died on August 23, 2019, meaning that every player who had ever won a Pennant for the Boston franchise of the National League is now dead.

That leaves 3 living former Boston Braves: Johnny Antonelli, Del Crandall and Bert Thiel.
Posted by Uncle Mike at 3:19 PM
Labels: 1948, 1952, 1953, atlanta braves, bert thiel, bob addis, boston, boston braves, braves field, clint conatser, del crandall, dick manville, johnny antonelli, living former
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Kelvin Jimenez Jersey

A New York man is facing drug trafficking charges after authorities seized more than 3 kilograms of fentanyl from a truck he was driving in the parking lot of a Market Basket store in Woburn, Massachusetts.

The truck driver, Kelvin Jimenez, 28, of the Bronx, New York, was taken into custody Thursday by Woburn police detectives and members of the Southern Middlesex Regional Drug Task Force.

Authorities said that after receiving information that a large amount of fentanyl was going to be delivered to the Market Basket plaza, units were deployed.

As a result, Jimenez was arrested for trafficking and the truck he was driving was seized.

Police said the approximate weight of the fentanyl seized was 3,238 grams.

It’s unclear when Jimenez will be arraigned or if he has an attorney.

Larry Demery Jersey

Four weeks ago, major league teams declined to tender 2020 contracts to 53 players, including 40 who were arbitration eligible. This was on top of 83 players previously sent outright from the start of the offseason, meaning they went unclaimed through waivers. In total, that’s 136 players who were theoretically available to all teams to reserve if they desired.

While the number of non-tenders was higher than the past couple years (though not unprecedented either), this is largely nothing unusual. While roster churn has picked up in intensity over the last decade, the same types of offseason transaction cycles happened in the 2000s, 1990s, and even most of the 1980s.

In one respect it was quite striking to me. I’ve spent a fair bit of time the last couple months digging through the Toronto Star and Globe and Mail coverage of the Blue Jays from the late-70s birth of the franchise. And a recurring theme was just how hard it was for the front office to find players worth acquiring. By definition, those 136 players referenced above either project as marginal, or whose salaries are beyond their production. Nonetheless, there’s numerous established quality MLB players, and plenty of interesting young players worthy of opportunity, some of whom will go on to quality big league careers.

This was simply not the case back in 1976. Consider that when the Jays joined the American League, it was after a wave of expansion that has increased the Major Leagues by 50% from 16 to 24 teams from 1960 to 1969. Those teams certainly had it pretty bad, especially the four who joined at once in 1969, but at least then the echo of the Baby Boom was resulting in a surge of prime-baseball-aged population entering into the system. That takes time to work through, and then along comes another expansionary wave diluting things.

That meant there was a shortage of talent to go around. Salary arbitration had started just three years before, and while teams were not at all happy pleased with it pushing up salaries, it was a good decade or so before non-tendering became a thing. It was the dawn of free agency, but a much limited version and the expansion teams were frozen out the first year since the free agent draft was the day before the expansion draft. In any event, the Jays weren’t going to be players, and only signed one drafted free agent before 1984 (Luis Gomez, a light hitting shortstop).

Waivers? In September 1977, the Jays claimed 24-year old John Hale from the Dodgers, who had promising AAA numbers but hadn’t translated to the majors (.214/.314/.317 in 478 PA). He promptly refused to report unless the Jays would give him a guaranteed 1978 contract, and you can imagine how well that went down. Two weeks later he was sent on to Seattle for the $20,000 the waiver claim that cost them. The next Spring, the Jays claimed Larry Demery from Pittsburgh, who had thrown 260 innings with a 3.06 ERA in 1975-76. After they got a closer look at his ailing shoulder, they decided they preferred their $20,000 and the claim was reversed four days later. Small wonder they didn’t use waivers for a long time.

In fact, about the only way the Jays did add real talent was when they leveraged their financial resources. They got Ron Fairly from Oakland when Charlie Finley wanted to dump his salary. They sent $200,000 to Texas to acquire Roy Howell, who had signed a three-year to end a holdout but was stuck behind other starters. Well into Spring Training 1978, Rico Carty was surplus to Cleveland and the Jays took on his hefty $135,000 (the entire 1977 payroll was $858,000). Right before the season began, the Royals deemed John Mayberry expendable with and the Jays took on the remaining three years of his contract at a reported $200,000 per year.

But those were the exceptions, and otherwise the Jays were limited to castoffs to try and fill out their roster. Within the first two years, the Jays never had more than 38 players on their 40-man, and more typically 35 or fewer. It was so dire that Pat Gillick purported to have not done trades that he otherwise would have (ie, established MLB players for younger prospects) because they didn’t have anyone who could slot for the departed regular. To illustrate this point, I’ve put a story that I like at the end.

With that in mind, I got to thinking whether a team of non-tendered 2019 players would compare to the actual 1977 expansion Blue Jays. The latter, it may be recalled, won just 54 games though was better on paper with a runs scored/allowed that would suggest 58. Here’s the starting line-up I put together:

The salaries are the MLBTR estimated arb salaries, the WAR is a rough estimate of what I’d project in 2020 and actual 1978 levels. On balance, I think I’d prefer the non-tender group of position players. There’s some holes, but I think my projection of 10 WAR is reasonable, with some upside if a couple players bounce back. The $54-million price tag is hefty, but some could probably be had cheaper.

The thing about the 1977 position players is that despite totalled just 2 fWAR, they surprisingly didn’t lack for solid performers. There were five players who were essentially average regulars or better, and another three who were not below average but not black holes. They totaled about 10 fWAR, the problem is of the 21 players on the roster, only nine had positive fWAR. The other 12 cumulatively had 2,000 plate appearances, and some were just awful, in particular the middle infielders. This is where the lack of depth killed the Jays, and the rest of the non-tenders/outright guys would be better.

The pitching side is a different story:

While I can put together a decent bullpen, I really struggled to just out the staff with players who have started. Kevin Gausman would be decent, and after that…I’d be happy to get 500 innings. I could see getting 4-5 WAR out of those guys, but I’d be wary of giving it all back with the lack of depth and whomever pitched the other 300 innings.

Keeping in mind that the 1977 Jays started the year with nine pitchers, had 10 most of the year and used 15 in total so it was a completely different staff, pitching was the strength of the 1977 team, with 10 WAR. The core of that was the trio of Jerry Garvin, Jesse Jefferson and Dave Lemanczyk turning in 650 innings close to league average at preventing runs, about 7.5-8 WAR. They got nothing beyond that, and Pete Vuckovich was the only contributor out of the bullpen, but that’s still well ahead of the non-tenders.

Of course, all four were acquired in the expansion draft, though other than Garvin at 4th overall none were taken early (19th, 43rd and 47th picks). And to some extent, the three starters all being good was fluky, as each only had one other good season afterwards (which is why despite the emergence of Dave Stieb and Jim Clancy it wasn’t until 1982 that the pitching staff outperformed the 1977 group). It certainly wouldn’t be hard today to supplement the non-tenders with some cheap free agent veterans to stabilize the starting rotation, in depth if not quality. But that’s beyond the scope of this exercise.

Fernando Rodriguez Jr. Jersey

BY ERIN SHERIDAN Staff Writer
A Harlingen man who pleaded guilty to possessing child pornography appeared at the federal courthouse Thursday morning in Brownsville, where the prosecutors delayed the man’s sentencing for another 60 days.

Genaro Torres Alejo Jr. was charged with one count of possession of child pornography in an indictment handed down by a grand jury on June 25, 2019. Alejo pleaded guilty Oct. 1, 2019, according to court records.

The indictment charged Alejo with knowingly possessing material that contained multiple images of child pornography, including depictions of a prepubescent minor who had not attained 12 years of age.

The man was scheduled to be sentenced Thursday.

During the hearing, prosecutors representing both parties agreed to a 60-day continuance to identify victims and determine appropriate means of compensation for those affected.

U.S. District Judge Fernando Rodriguez Jr. told attorneys that past cases have included victim impact statements and specific requests for retribution from identified victims.

Government prosecutors made note that an issue with the database used to identify victims had inhibited their efforts. Only one victim had been identified, but more requests were coming in, they told the judge.

According to a criminal complaint, Alejo was arrested May 30 after Homeland Security Investigations agents with the Rio Grande Valley Child Exploitation Investigation Task Force executed a search warrant at the man’s Harlingen residence.

Five days earlier, HSI agents identified an IP address in possession of image and video files of child pornography. They initiated an investigation, leading them to Alejo, according to the document.

The complaint stated that Alejo admitted to agents that he used his laptop to search for, receive, and possess images and video files of child pornography and that he had been doing so for two years.

An initial review of the laptop led to the discovery of the 200 video files, agents wrote.

[email protected]

Anthony Santander Jersey

Draft Anthony Santander as a fantasy bench player who could make an occasional spot start in next season. His 409.44 projected fantasy points puts him at #47 behind Gregory Polanco and ahead of Thomas Pham. He has averaged 2.87 fantasy points in his past 93 games. Our projected per game average is virtually the same. He is projected to average 2.72 fantasy points. His rank based on avg proj (#102) is worse than his rank based on total fantasy points. He is underrated if you compare his ownership based rank with his projection rank. At 46%, he is the #64 most highly owned outfielder. Anthony Santander is expected to improve on last season’s #64 fantasy position rank.

NEXT SEASON RANK (OF) PROJECTION FANTASY STATS IN 2019
#45 Brandon Nimmo (25% OWN) 416 FP, 2.85 per game 160 FP, 68 gp, 2.35 per game (#84)
#46 Gregory Polanco (24% OWN) 415 FP, 2.84 per game 94 FP, 41 gp, 2.28 per game (#90)
#47 Anthony Santander (46% OWN) 409 FP, 2.72 per game 267 FP, 93 gp, 2.87 per game (#41)
#48 Thomas Pham (98% OWN) 408 FP, 2.71 per game 432 FP, 145 gp, 2.98 per game (#32)
#49 Ryan Braun (74% OWN) 406 FP, 2.95 per game 368 FP, 143 gp, 2.57 per game (#63)
These projections power SportsLine’s Computer Picks and Fantasy Data. But for contest winning DFS optimal lineups by top experts like Mike McClure visit SportsLine’s new Daily Fantasy Hub.

ANTHONY SANTANDER WEEK 1 AND 2 FANTASY OUTLOOK
Anthony Santander is projected for 7.36 fantasy points in 3 games the rest of the week in week 1 which only ranks him as the #72 projected outfielder and not a fantasy relevant player. This is projected to be a better than average week with more fantasy points per game than he is projected to average per game the rest of the season. He is ranked above Michael Conforto but behind Bryan Reynolds the rest of the week. Week 2 will be better based on projected rank (#65). He is projected for 14.33 fantasy points.

WEEK 1 RANK (OF) PROJECTION ROS FP PROJ AVG
#70 Adam Eaton 7.5 FP 2.78 FP
#71 Bryan Reynolds 7.4 FP 2.92 FP
#72 Anthony Santander 7.4 FP 2.72 FP
#73 Michael Conforto 7.3 FP 3.09 FP
#74 Franmil Reyes 7.2 FP 2.95 FP
WEEK 2 RANK (OF) PROJECTION ROS FP PROJ AVG
#63 Kole Calhoun 14.5 FP 2.68 FP
#64 Randal Grichuk 14.4 FP 2.76 FP
#65 Anthony Santander 14.3 FP 2.72 FP
#66 Christin Stewart 14.3 FP 2.5 FP
#67 Ramon Laureano 14.1 FP 3.04 FP
FANTASY PROJECTIONS AND ACTUAL STATS
The tables below show projected stats (totals and averages) for the rest of the season and upcoming weeks. Below the projection are actual stats from last season.

ANTHONY SANTANDER FP HR RBI R BB SB
2020 Projection 409 30 83 71 37 3.9
— Per Game (151 Proj) 2.7 0.20 0.55 0.47 0.24 0.03
3/26 to 3/29 (2.8 Games) 7.4 0.56 1.5 1.3 0.67 0.07
3/30 to 4/5 (5.6 Games) 14.3 0.98 3.0 2.5 1.4 0.13
2019 Season 267 20 59 46 19 1
— Per Game (93 GP) 2.9 0.22 0.63 0.49 0.20 0.01

Bronson Arroyo Jersey

Might as well start here given the luxury tax payroll situation. Technically, pretty much every player on the roster is a salary dump candidate, but something tells me the Astros won’t move Verlander or Bregman or Jose Altuve to free up payroll. As Yankees GM Brian Cashman likes to say, no player is untouchable, but some are more touchable than others.

Looking over the club’s roster, three Astros players stand out as potential salary dump candidates:

SS Carlos Correa: $7.4 million projected salary in 2020 (via MLB Trade Rumors)
RHP Brad Peacock: $4.6 million projected salary in 2020 (via MLB Trade Rumors)
OF Josh Reddick: $13 million salary in 2020
I think a Correa trade is very unlikely, but the rumors have popped up, and I would never completely rule out a deal. The Astros can slide Bregman over to shortstop, his natural position, and install Abraham Toro at third base, or perhaps move Yuli Gurriel back to the hot corner and plug Yordan Alvarez in at first base. It could work. I don’t expect it to happen, but it could work.

The Astros have Kyle Tucker, a highly regarded young player, available to step into the lineup to replace Reddick. Finding another outfielder is not the obstacle here though. Reddick is owed a good deal of money this coming season and he’s mustered only a 93 OPS+ the last two years. Why trade for Reddick when you could sign, say, Yasiel Puig and get similar or better production?

To unload Reddick, the Astros may have to attached a sweetener. The Diamondbacks gave the Braves righty Touki Toussaint to take on Bronson Arroyo’s contract a few years ago. The Padres took on Chase Headley’s salary to get Bryan Mitchell from the Yankees two years ago. The Mets are open to giving up Dominic Smith to dump Jed Lowrie’s salary. It’s been done before.

Houston is deep in pitching prospects — “As always, this system is loaded with homegrown pitching, some of which has come out of nowhere during the last 12 months,” wrote FanGraphs in their recent farm system analysis — and parting with an arm(s) to clear Reddick’s salary and open a lineup spot for Tucker is something the Astros have reportedly investigated this winter.

The Orioles stand out as a potential trade partner for Reddick. GM Mike Elias worked under Luhnow with the Astros and absorbing the final year of a bad contract to add young pitching to the system seems worthwhile for a rebuilding team. Of course, Baltimore doesn’t seem inclined to spend much money this year. Trading Reddick, even with a sweetener, will be easier said than done.

As for Peacock, he’s been a solid and versatile depth arm the last few seasons, but committing close to $5 million to a guy who may only be a long or middle reliever could be tough to swallow for a team on a self-imposed budget. Swapping Peacock for a prospect and replacing him internally (Bryan Abreu?) seems like the easiest way to get payroll under the $248 million threshold.

Keith Johnson Jersey

Metairie, LA – Keith Johnson will take over in the New Orleans Baby Cakes’ dugout for the 2019 season as the 16thmanager in franchise history, and will be joined on the coaching staff by pitching coach Jeremy Powell, hitting coach Justin Mashore, defensive coach Chris Briones, athletic trainer Greg Harrel, and strength and conditioning coachRobert Reichert.

Johnson has accumulated 679 career wins as a manager, two-thirds of which have come at the Triple-A level in seven seasons at the helm of the Salt Lake Bees. Johnson debuted as a manager in 2008, the first of three seasons managing a the Single-A level in the Angels organization, culminating in a California League Championship Series appearance with Rancho Cucamonga in 2010. The 2013 Pacific Coast League Manager of the Year, Johnson compiled a 468-504 record as the Bees manager and was just three wins shy of equaling Phil Roof’s franchise mark for managerial victories when he was promoted to the Angels’ major league staff last August. A fourth round selection by the Dodgers in the 1992 draft, Johnson spent the final two seasons of his 12-year playing career in Salt Lake, having reached the majors with the Anaheim Angels in 2000.

Powell returns to New Orleans for his second season as pitching coach and his eighth season in the Marlins system. He previously had two-year stints at Single-A Advanced Jupiter, where his 2017 pitching staff ranked second in the Florida State League in ERA and shutouts, as well as Single-A Greensboro and the Gulf Coast League rookie-level affiliate after making his coaching debut in 2010 in the Arizona Diamondbacks organization. Selected by the Montreal Expos in the fourth round in 1994, Powell pitched in parts of three seasons (1998-2000) in Montreal before playing in Japan for Nippon Professional Baseball from 2001-08, where he recorded four seasons with at least 10 victories.

Mashore comes to the Marlins after seven seasons in the Texas Rangers organization, the last three of which were spent as the major league assistant hitting coach. After four years in the minors, including 2014-15 at Triple-A with Round Rock, Mashore helped the 2015 Rangers become the first team in MLB history to have nine players hit at least 17 home runs. He started his coaching career in 2003 in the Toronto Blue Jays system following an 11-year playing career, which began in 1991 when he was a third round draft pick of the Detroit Tigers.

In his second stint in the Marlins organization, Harrel is back for his third season in New Orleans following 10 years in the Los Angeles Dodgers organization, the last two of which were spent with Triple-A Oklahoma City. He was on the Dodgers’ major league training staff from 2012-13, and previously worked as the Marlins’ Triple-A athletic trainer in Albuquerque in 2004.

Reichert has served as a strength and conditioning coach in the Marlins organization since 2012 after receiving a kinesiology degree from the University of Louisiana-Lafayette, and was with Double-A Jacksonville in 2016-17 before joining the Baby Cakes’ staff last year.

Article courtesy of New Orleans Baby Cakes Information Department.

Travis Schlichting Jersey

Travis Schlichting
18 OF 23
You can’t help but think what Don Mattingly has to say about Travis Schlichting’s mullet.

Then again, does a mullet first come to mind when describing California hair styles? I doubt it.

However, Travis shows something entertaining after everything the Dodgers have been through this year.

Doug Drabek
19 OF 23
Doug Drabek’s mullet looks sort of rough and scrappy from this angle.

But since the beard and goatee appear rough as well, it all flows well together.

Larry Walker
20 OF 23
What more can you say about Larry Walker’s mully?

It’s solid and gets the job done.

No need to be fancy, just straight-up business.

Troy Tulowitzki
21 OF 23
Who knows how long Troy will keep it, but any fresh mullet with some creative buzz on the side is gold.

Maybe Tulowitzki will continue his style, and we’ll get to see more designs.

Jess Dobernic Jersey

Checklist
1949 Bowman Baseball Checklist
240 cards.
1 Vern Bickford RC
2 Whitey Lockman
3 Bob Porterfield RC
4 Jerry Priddy RC
5 Hank Sauer
6 Phil Cavarretta RC
7 Joe Dobson RC
8 Murry Dickson RC
9 Ferris Fain
10 Ted Gray RC
11 Lou Boudreau RC
12 Cass Michaels RC
13 Bob Chesnes RC
14 Curt Simmons RC
15 Ned Garver RC
16 Al Kozar RC
17 Earl Torgeson RC
18 Bobby Thomson
19 Bobby Brown RC
20 Gene Hermanski RC
21 Frank Baumholtz RC
22 Harry “P-Nuts” Lowrey RC
23 Bobby Doerr
24 Stan Musial
25 Carl Scheib RC
26 George Kell
27 Bob Feller
28 Don Kolloway RC
29 Ralph Kiner
30 Andy Seminick
31 Dick Kokos RC
32 Eddie Yost RC
33 Warren Spahn
34 Dave Koslo
35 Vic Raschi RC
36 Pee Wee Reese
37 Johnny Wyrostek
38 Emil Verban
39 Billy Goodman
40 Red Munger RC
41 Lou Brissie RC
42 Walter Evers RC
43 Dale Mitchell
44 Dave Philley RC
45 Wally Westlake RC
46 Robin Roberts RC
47 Johnny Sain
48 Willard Marshall
49 Spec Shea
50 Jackie Robinson
51 Herm Wehmeier
52 Johnny Schmitz RC
53 Jack Kramer RC
54 Marty Marion
55 Eddie Joost
56 Pat Mullin RC
57 Gene Bearden RC
58 Bob Elliott
59 Jack Lohrke
60 Yogi Berra
61 Rex Barney
62 Grady Hatton RC
63 Andy Pafko
64 Dom DiMaggio
65 Enos Slaughter
66 Elmer Valo
67 Alvin Dark
68 Sheldon Jones
69 Tommy Henrich
70 Carl Furillo RC
71 Vern Stephens
72 Tommy Holmes RC
73 Billy Cox RC
74 Tom McBride RC
75 Eddie Mayo RC
76 Bill Nicholson RC
77 Ernie Bonham RC
78 Sam Zoldak RC
79 Ron Northey RC
80 Bill McCahan
81 Virgil “Red” Stallcup RC
82 Joe Page
83 Bob Scheffing RC
84 Roy Campanella RC
85 Johnny Mize
86 Johnny Pesky
87 Randy Gumpert RC
88 Bill Salkeld RC
89 Mizel Platt RC
90 Gil Coan RC
91 Dick Wakefield RC
92 Willie Jones RC
93 Ed Stevens RC
94 James Vernon RC
95 Howie Pollet RC
96 Taft Wright
97 Danny Litwhiler RC
98 Phil Rizzuto
99 Frank Gustine RC
100 Gil Hodges RC
101 Sid Gordon
102 Stan Spence RC
103 Joe Tipton RC
104 Eddie Stanky RC
105 Bill Kennedy RC
106 Jake Early RC
107 Eddie Lake RC
108 Ken Heintzelman RC
109 Ed Fitz Gerald RC
110 Early Wynn RC
111 Red Schoendienst
112 Sam Chapman
113 Ray Lamanno RC
114 Allie Reynolds
115 Emil “Dutch” Leonard
116 Joe Hatton RC
117 Walker Cooper
118 Sam Mele RC
119 Floyd Baker RC
120 Cliff Fannin RC121 Mark Christman RC
122 George Vico RC
123 Johnny Blatnick RC
124 Danny Murtaugh
125 Ken Keltner RC
126 Al Brazle RC
127 Hank Majeski RC
128 Johnny Vander Meer
129 Bill Johnson
130 Harry “The Hat” Walker RC
131 Paul Lehner RC
132 Al Evans RC
133 Aaron Robinson RC
134 Hank Borowy RC
135 Stan Rojek RC
136 Hank Edwards RC
137 Ted Wilks RC
138 “Buddy” Rosar
139 Hank “Bow-Wow” Arft RC
140 Ray Scarborough RC
141 Tony Lupien RC
142 Eddie Waitkus RC
143 Bob Dillinger RC
144 Mickey Haefner RC
145 “Blix” Donnelly RC
146 Myron McCormick RC
147 Elmer Singleton RC
148 Bob Swift RC
149 Roy Partee RC
150 Allie Clark RC
151 Mickey Harris RC
152 Clarence Maddern RC
153 Phil Masi RC
154 Clint Hartung
155 Fermin Guerra RC
156 Al Zarilla RC
157 Walt Masterson RC
158 Harry Brecheen
159 Glen Moulder RC
160 Jim Blackburn RC
161 “Jocko” Thompson RC
162 Preacher Roe RC
163 Clyde McCullough RC
164 Vic Wertz RC
165 “Snuffy” Stirnweiss
166 Mike Tresh RC
167 Babe Martin RC
168 Doyle Lade RC
169 Jeff Heath RC
170 Bill Rigney
171 Dick Fowler RC
172 Eddie Pellagrini RC
173 Bud Stewart RC
174 Terry Moore RC
175 Luke Appling
176 Ken Raffensberger RC
177 Stan Lopata RC
178 Tommy Brown RC
179 Hugh Casey
180 Neil Berry
181 Gus Niarhos RC
182 Hal Peck RC
183 Lou Stringer RC
184 Bob Chipman RC
185 Pete Reiser
186 Buddy Kerr
187 Phil Marchildon RC
188 Karl Drews RC
189 Earl Wooten RC
190 Jim Hearn RC
191 Joe Haynes RC
192 Harry Gumbert
193 Ken Trinkle RC
194 Ralph Branca RC
195 Eddie Bockman RC
196 Fred Hutchinson
197 Johnny Lindell
198 Steve Gromek RC
199 “Tex” Hughson RC
200 Jess Dobernic RC
201 Sibby Sisti RC
202 Larry Jansen
203 Barney McCosky
204 Bob Savage RC
205 Dick Sisler RC
206 Bruce Edwards
207 Johnny Hopp RC
208 “Dizzy” Trout
209 Charlie Keller
210 Joe Gordon RC
211 Dave “Boo” Ferris RC
212 Ralph Hamner RC
213 Charles “Red” Barret RC
214 Richie Ashburn RC
215 Kirby Higbe
216 “Schoolboy” Rowe
217 Marino Pieretti RC
218 Dick Kryhoski RC
219 Virgil “Fire” Trucks
220 Johnny McCarthy
221 Bob Muncrief RC
222 Alex Kellner RC
223 Bobby Hofman RC
224 Satchel Paige
225 Jerry Coleman RC
226 Duke Snider RC
227 Fritz Ostermueller
228 Jackie Mayo RC
229 Ed Lopat RC
230 Augie Galan
231 Earl Johnson RC
232 George McQuinn
233 Larry Doby
234 “Rip” Sewell RC
235 Jim Russell RC
236 Fred Sanford RC
237 Monte Kennedy RC
238 Bob Lemon RC
239 Frank “Babe” McCormick
240 Babe Young1949 Bowman Baseball Cards 24

Variation Checklist
The following is a list of players who have variation versions. The ones listed are the rarer versions.

#1-3 and 5-73 can be found with white or grey stock on the card backs.

4 Jerry Priddy – name on front
78 Sam Zoldak – name on front
83 Bob Scheffing – name on front
85 Johnny Mize – name on front
88 Bill Salkeld – name on front
98 Phil Rizzuto – name on front
109 Ed Fitz Gerald – printed name on back
124 Danny Murtaugh – printed name on back
126 Al Brazle – printed name on back
127 Hank Majeski – printed name on back
132 Al Evans – printed name on back
143 Bob Dillinger – printed name on back

Mike Prendergast Jersey

INVERNESS, Fla. (AP) – The Florida Highway Patrol says a vehicle driven by a Florida sheriff struck and killed a pedestrian who was walking on a highway.

The agency’s report says 62-year-old Citrus County Sheriff Mike Prendergast was traveling on U.S. 19 in an unmarked patrol vehicle around 9:10 p.m. Wednesday when he struck 59-year-old Ronnie Anthony Heath. Troopers say the man died at the scene. No charges have been filed against Prendergast.